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. >>> let me finish with a behind the scenes look at what really happened at the great kennedy/nixon debates. you will love these stories i have dug up. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> roun brown's in the national journal wrote the main reason oen is doing better in battleground zats has to do with his increase from white working women. keep in mind, back in 2008 nationally obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, hovers around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. lo
-deportation for illegal immigrants. >>> let me fin wish a behind the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communities across the country. we hired three thousand people just last year. bp invests more in america than in any other country. in fact, over the last five years, no other energy company has invested more in the us than bp. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. today, our commitment to the gulf, and to america, has never been st
this is exactly what richard nixon said in his debate with jack kennedy. i share jack kennedy's mission. i share his concerns. we have the same goals. people at home are cringing, why am i giving him money, why am i voting for a guy who has the same goals as another guy. cynthia, you will probably not remember the nixon/kennedy debates, but you don't say the other guy is a good, compassionate guy and he cares about people. i do, too! that's what he's saying. i'm just like him. if you believe he's compassionate, i am too! he's selling obama. >> you say that if you don't have anything else to say, chris. another thing the bloomberg poll shows is that voters -- more voters believe that barack obama has a concrete plan for helping the middle class than believe that mitt romney has such a plan. that's another problem mitt romney has. he had expected that the economy would win the election for him. all he would have to do is go to people and say, i'm not barack obama. i can do a better job. in fact, he needed to do a lot more. obama has laid out specific proposals. he's had a job for months now, but m
do. >>> the candidates need no introduction. the republican candidate vice president richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i would hope he would grant me the same. the question before us is, which point of view and which party do we want to lead the united states? >> mr. nixon, would you like to comment on that statement? >> i have no comment. >> the sweat pooling onyxen's chin while kennedy is over there cold chillin'. was the presidential race decided right there because of heavy perspiration on the vice presidential mug? can you see who won the first televised presidential debate with the sound off or is that an oversimplification of a slew of factor sfls do campaigns matter or does the man with the best platform for that moment in history actually win? our next guest studied the last six decades of campaignsin exploring thorg. how campaigns do and do not matter. christopher, how are you? >> great. >> i'm of the school that campaigns do matter. that you have to present your ideas and present
president richard nixon face off in the first tell vafted presidentipre-- televised presidential debate. you know the story. the tanned john f. kennedy and then richard nixon. >>> as we reported the buckeye state battle continues today. both mitt romney and president obama in that crucial battleground state. here's romney moments ago ins we terville, ohio, where he wrapped up an event with golfing legend jack nicklaus. >> after the debates and the campaigns and all the ads are over, the people in ohio are going to say loud and clear on november 6th, we can't do four more years. we must do better. good morning, all. >> good morning, chuck. >> let's start where where things stand in ohio. we have a whole bunch of polls. saw new york times, quinnipiac polls. they show giant leads, eye-popping if you will. the president ten points up in ohio, nine points up in florida, 12 in pennsylvania. i don't know why they have pennsylvania. i think we've all moved it off the battleground. susan page, we can debate the leads but we can't debate who's leading. >> in ohio it seems clear that this is a state th
power on a certain level. i mean, look, nixon, reagan, george w. bush, republican presidents have learned how to get stuff done at times in the face of congress and sometimes controlled by the other party. you know, this whole notion of the imperial presidency that arose under nixon, not coincidentally, a republican, i think you said it was kind of a tori sense built. but it's really a concentration of power. >> are they stronger than the democrats and they know what that is? assembly, parliamentary? >> in some ways they have been more skillful and more ruthless in the way that they have moved the levers of power. in washington and outside of washington, to get stuff done. >> joy, i don't think the republicans have a karl rove a. malignant sense of power, i'm going to be the architect and i'm going to rule and they are spreading the money around and trying to get back the power. it does seem almost obsessive, the love of the white house. >> i think eugene robinson is right. for conservatives, the idea of being the cowboy, they like the self-image for themselves and want that image
nixon declared, he wanted to criminalize but also treat a lot of addicts. we have gone away from the treatment model all together. why did we lose sight of that being part of the whole model? >> easy politics to say you are tough on crime. nixon discovered that in '68 he made crime a national issue. the funny thing about nixon, he deserves credit on the ground how he dealt with adikts. he dealt with a drug problem in a way where two-thirds of his drug budget were spent on treatment, only a third on interdiction and law enforcement. he knew personally and practically from experience that treatment was the way to go yet he also knew on the campaign trail that doesn't sell. i will protect from you the evil ers do down the block, i will protect you from this scourge in american life that got him like theed in a landslide in '72, now politics have followed suit ever since, reagan, clinton, both parties agree on one thing, saying you are not tough on crime has been political suicide. i believe it is changing but it has been till now political suicide. >> well, you were just telling us
nixon, i feel sorry for the guy because he doesn't know which dick nixon to be on any particular day. he wants the support of the tea party crowd. he needs them, john and mark, but he would never be a tea party person. he wouldn't show up at a yahoo kind of politics we don't like government. he's not been a life long foreign policy hawk, but he wants the support of the ne-yo con community out there. he wants people who are hawkish. he's not a member of the religion right. he doesn't run around liberty university or hang around with jerry falwell but he wants their support. he's not really a ryan republican identify log conviction politician but he put him on the ticket. isn't that the fundamental problem with the guy? he wants to date these people through the election. he wants their support, but he doesn't want to be one of them. he doesn't want to marry them. is that true? >> yes. look, chris, i think he's a person who is fundamentally ill suited to being the republican nominee given what the republican party currently is. and you could say that on a bunch of different levels. it's an
's got to score. >> there was a time between the famous kennedy-nixon tapes that there were no televised debates. why are they considered so vital now? >> well, the kennedy-nixon debates created so much attention in 1960. many people think that's why ted kennedy won. if you recall ford made famously the gap that -- and then certainly by 1980, ronald reagan was very behind in the polls was just able to tidal wave over jimmy carter with quips like there you go again in a sort of staged format. since 1980, they have become part of the american landscape. >> the "new york times" recently wrote about this debate prep and the president of the united states is an awesome figure merely to share the platform with him on equal terms is the gain in stature, good performance will be gauged even better. why would any president agree to participate in an event that ultimately -- the -- because it's become now a demand, president obama suddenly bailed on debates. then, you know, he would be seeming like a poor sport. and also these debates are agreed upon long before the fall season, they're everything
of republican candidates have done over -- going all the way back to richard nixon. that is, use code words, code issues, and try to use trade as a lever. it's obviously not working in ohio where his support is going down. one thing that i have to say for them at this point is the low expectations going into the debate actually help them. because i think the press would kind of like to give them another run or another chance to go around the track. so if he does decently in the debate, he'll get that chance but i agree with krystal. he would have to win that debate. >> in a way that he's not capable of, frankly. >> is he too elitist that he just can't connect? >> frankly, he he doesn't have the goods. this is not like he's a new candidate. he's been running for president for six years. he's had ample opportunity to connect with people, to introduce himself, and he's failed to do it for these six years. i don't see how these debates are going to make a difference. >> bob shrum, krystal ball, thank you for your time tonight. >> thank you. >>> coming up, when republicans get desperate, they la
that ted rogers put there for nixon and he said, don't let anybody change this. i said, get out of the way or i'm going to call the police. he immediately left and i changed the air conditioning back to normal. wilson understand the game and how it was going to be played. the candidates had their jobs to do, so did their handlers. he said his opponent, he said, he wanted to keep his job because of the screw-up that happened in the first debate. this is what goes on in politics. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. >>> tomorrow i'll be in denver. we'll have live editions of "hardball" at 5:00 and 7:00 eastern. and complete coverage of the debate with my msnbc colleagues at 8:00. "the ed show" starts right now. >>> good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show." 25 hours before the first presidential debate and 35 days until the 2012 election. mitt romney and paul ryan are scrambling. robert gibbs is here tonight to respond. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >>> you can use your charitable deduction or home mortgage deduction and can fill a that bucket,
president richard nixon had recently gotten over a bout with an infection that left him looking shaky. kennedy looked healthy and strong. when kennedy won nearly half said the debate played a role in the decision. al gore was criticized for sighing and rolling his eyes while debating george bush in 2000. and then capped it off with this moment. >> it is not what your philosophy and position on issues but can you get things done. and i believe i can. >> that's funny. i'm sorry. you hear this next one repeated many times. it came from ronald reagan during his debate with jimmy carter. reagan posed a simple question. >> are you better off than you were four years ago? >> four years later president reagan was 73 facing concerns about his age, an issue compounded by his shaky first debate and then turned the weakness into a strength with this line. >> i want you to know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. >> bill clinton was on the other side of that equation while debating another 7
's nixon with the flop sweat. george h.w. bush looking at his watch. appearances count, don't they? >> they really do. and a professional knows that. george h.w. bush in that debate, that third one in richmond in 1992, he was looking at his watch because he was trying to make the point that one of the other candidates had run over time. it didn't really compute this was sending the message that he was impatient, just the kind of message he didn't want to send. >> humor can be an effective tool, diffuse a weakness. >> i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. >> and at that moment, a lot of people said well, there's the ball game. including his opponent. >> including walter mondale. >> what do you think about humor as a tool in this debate tonight? >> you'd better be a very accomplished actor like reagan or else it probably won't work. in that case, reagan said certain things that might have given rise to further worry he was too old to serve a second term. got things wrong. ran over in his f
that he gave while richard nixon continuously lost ground thereafter. the story goes that it was kennedy's tan, his youthful look that won him the first televised debate. do you think that's the full story? >> i think that's part of an lore. i think much more was this. before that first debate john kennedy was thought of as a young, not very distinguished absentee senator, junior senator from massachusetts debating against the vice-president of the united states who had stood up to kruschev. this marvelous debater. kennedy was able to not only match nixon but exceed him. people began to think of him as a possible president. >> are debates necessary for the democratic process? have the best debaters proven to be then the best presidents? >> they have in one sense. and that is one of the most important things you want from a president is someone who if he has to make a tough decision can go to americans and say, this may be unpopular with you but let me try to explain it, explain why it's the right thing to do. if a president doesn't have that he's not going to serve very well and the deba
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
-off with nixon. kennedy kennedy kennedy kennedy ♪ ♪ do you want a man for president who is seasoned through and through ♪ ♪ but not so dog gone seasoned that he won't try something new ♪ ♪ a man who's old enough to know and young enough to do ♪ ♪ well it's up to you it's up to you it's strictly up to you ♪ >> don't have ads like that these days. the 2012 obama version has arrived thanks to a website called write me a jingle. ♪ do you want a man for president who's seasoned through and through ♪ ♪ but not so doggone seasoned he won't try something new ♪ ♪ a man who's old enough to know but young enough to do ♪ ♪ it's up to you, it's up to you ♪ ♪ it's strictly up to you barack obama obama ♪ >> tough not to feel refreshed by politics after that one. >>> has anybody been as big a player in the presidential campaign than mr. bill clinton, bubba? well, both president obama and mitt romney spoke at the clinton global initiative up in new york today and that's ahead. they're all genuflecting to the big guy, elvis. he's back. watching "hardball," the place for poli
. >> i play a lot of golf. >> nixon plays golf. >> i don't want to whine and complain, if i was romney in the first ten minutes, i would have -- bam. >> they get you here right here. >> is he a good dancer? >> he's gotten to be a better dancer. >> you really put your foot down. >> stop it. this is hard. you want to try it? get in the ring. >> oh my? was i a little strong? >> when you go after my man -- >> everyone is giving me high fives. >> do you think this would be going better if he had nominated someone else? >> and what's burning down here? >> if you don't man up you got to shut up. >> this is a guy that cares for the 100%. >> we use fairly right now so people don't get tired of her. >> let's get right to our panel now. we're joined by goldie taylor managing editor of the goldie taylor project, jimy williams and julian epstein. julian, if i might begin with you. we saw ann romney last night on with jay leno. she wondered if she had come off a little strong last week when she chastised all of us when we didn't realize how lucky we are for having her husba
out. >> i mean nixon and sparrow agnew perfected it in the '60s and '70s we're the pointy headed intellectuals and turned the notion of the elite being big business and those people that make the decisions those liberals who want to tell you how to live and where to send your children to school. >> you saw it with president obama where the first african-american president who has credentials, very much like every other president, ivy league education, all of that sort of thing, suddenly gets framed in this way that his intellectual accomplishments are inappropriate and instead what we saw was a kind of populism that emerged from the mccain and palin campaign in '08 to push back against that. we're seeing a renewal of that. >> mitt romney -- >> joint degrees from harvard. >> exactly. doesn't really match with this candidate but there's a way in which it emerges in '08. >> so used to using it. >> about the attacking academic credentials when you counted up in 2008 how often people's education was specifically cited in major newspaper articles, barack obama's time at harvard went ov
richard nixon a long time to come out of hiding. and i'm not sure that he ever came back and spoke at a convention. >> paul glastris, author of "elephant in the room," thank you so much for your time today. it sounds like a fascinating read. full disclosure here, i have only started it. they keep me pretty busy here, paul. hope to get around to the whole thing. >> hope you enjoy it. >> coming up, what beer you drink has to say about your politics. all of a sudden, the folks here on the floor have all perked up. >>> a little bit later, accusations politics in missouri have become unladylike. this is msnbc. [ male announcer ] let's say you need to take care of legal matters. wouldn't it be nice if there was an easier, less-expensive option than using a traditional lawyer? well, legalzoom came up with a better way. we took the best of the old and combined it with modern technology. together you get quality services on your terms, with total customer support. legalzoom documents have been accepted in all 50 states, and they're backed by a 100% satisfaction guarantee. so go to legalzoom
. >> richard nixon probably ruined the taping thing for a lot of people. >> he did. >> it was a fantastic collection -- a fantastic archive, it comes with its own audio cd which is great so that you can listen to this stuff over and over again. i can't underscore how fascinating this is moments in history. congratulations on that. >> thank you so much. >> thanks for joining us. the book is "listening in the secret white house recordings of jfk. "coming up, all in, akin lightning rod missouri congressman todd akin isn't backing away from his challenge to senator claire mcskas kill and some key republicans are getting back on the akin bandwagon. chris christie is not one of them. >> over the course of the week we're seeing more prominent republicans senator demint, tom coburn, lindsey graham coming out in support of todd akin. do you think he should have the support of the republican party? >> into no. >> in. >> >>. >> no. >> no, i don't. >> the fallout from the latest akin push next in what now. [ female announcer ] need help keeping your digestive balance? try the #1 gastroenterologist re
that have done that. one was the debate between nixon and kennedy. it was televised. kennedy came off as being much smoother, more likesable. that's an example of how high the stakes would have to be for there to be a real game-changer. i think what you're going to see more likely is viewers watching these debates in the aggregate. they're all very close together. and advisers are saying they're expecting the polls to get tighter as we get closer to election day barring any major misstep from either candidate. martin. >> nbc's krit tin welker, from politics to pugilism, you are there. thank you so much, kristin. >> reporter: thanks, martin. we'll be right back. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay
-aways as an issue, that goes back to kennedy and nixon. we've been talking about this part of reaction shots over 50 years. candidates still haven't mastered the thought you have to think about what you're looking like when you don't speak. bill clinton was one who actually used to practice his facial expressions for when he wasn't talking. i think most candidates would poo-poo that idea, but i think there is value in it. >> there is spin room for both sides, but the spin is going to be happening in the moment through social media, through twitter, through facebook. do you think that is a huge development because one false move can be global in a matter of seconds and trending on twitter? >> absolutely. you're on to something with that theory. i think twitter becomes the new spin room. the difference is that the spin room is spinning during the debate, not necessarily after. also, always before the spinning was handed down from the top down, and now you've got everybody in the country with the ability to weigh in and have an opinion as the debate is happening. i see a shift in a couple of ways. not
and debates have not been so decisive except when the races are very already tight, kennedy/nixon, gore/bush, but we may well see the narrative of a 1% romney which we've seen reinforcing the 47%. video and that -- and out of touch with not only his own being who he was, but with ordinary voters, average people in this country. >> i'm -- i'm eager to see how romney deals with follow-up questions. ryan's stuff the contention i don't have enough time, what i'm trying to basically tear apart the american social compact, you know, in some -- if you interpret it in one way but massively overhaul this nation's sort of tax plan, but i don't have time to get into the details, president obama's going to press him on this. >> well, right. well, one, you a situation where, you know, mitt romney apparently has all these memorized zingers that he's going to unleash on the president tomorrow, but then, what you don't hear folks talk about is, once the zinger has been thrown out there, then what? so he lays out and says energy independence, well when the follow-up question comes, what's the there ther
. president eisenhower didn't do that, president nixon didn't do that, president reagan made us feel like we were all in it together. >> i've never seen a politician say, i'll take the other part of the vote. i'm not interested in your half, or in this case, 70% he's giving away. >> that's right. i have never heard such language. i think it will allow obama to extend the 47% argument to not only ryan but to the entire republican party. he can say, this is a party that slices and dices the american public. in some ways i think this argument about 30% of the people being lazy, 47% of the people being lazy, goes against the idea of american exceptionalism. how can america be that exceptional if 50% of the country is lazy? we know that's not true. america is an exceptional country. you'll see both romney and ryan struggle with this and have something to answer to tonight on stage and then when ryan takes the stage ultimately next week. but i do think ryan and biden do have something that neither of the principles have. that is, they speak from their gut. they speak from their hearts. and i think
political era for getting people like joe mccarthy and richard nixon. talk about the media establishment's view of eisenhower. >> the media establishment basically loved eisenhower. he was their friend. you read his private correspondence. he and the publisher of "time" were great buddies. a lot of time people working in the white house -- it was such a different age. it was not as adversarial. it was much more trusting. correspondents would come out over to the white house, have a few drinks a s with ike. he'd say stuff off the record. he even talked about recognizing china. imagine if that had leaked during the 1950s. it was just a different era. and ike was trustworthy. reporters also trusted him. >> also talk about ike the republican president that was willing to send troops to little rock. >> you know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegregated the armed services. it wasn't truman. he appointed all the federa
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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